banter

banter vb Banter, chaff, kid, rag, rib, josh, jolly are comparable when denoting to make fun of good-naturedly (as by reminding one of an actual fault, foible, failure, or shortcoming, by exaggerated praise obviously remote from the truth, or by playful imputation of undeserved success). The same distinctions in implications and connotations are found in their corresponding nouns.
Banter is the generic term and may usually be substituted for any of the others, though not without loss of specificness
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"Why didn't you get tipsy, Sir? Don't you ever intoxicate yourself but at lawful marriages? . . ." Ripton endured his bantering that he might hang about Richard— Meredith

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To chaff is to nettle with rough banter
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they chaffed me for leaving so early— Price

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Kid is frequently as general in meaning as banter
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he is very fond of placing his hand on his heart and declaiming about his warm virtues. He gets a lot of kidding for it— Gunther

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More often than perhaps any other word in this group, however, it specifically implies an attempt at good-natured imposition on one's gullibility; thus, "No kidding?" is a common way of asking "Are you serious?" of one who has made a statement that sounds incredible
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she says he's going to do a portrait of her. I think he's kidding her— Harper's

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Used with a reflexive pronoun, kid implies a shutting one's eyes to the truth
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if you think you can avoid hard work and long hours and yet write something memorable, you are just kidding yourself

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To rag is to banter repeatedly or persistently and often annoyingly to the victim
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there were, even, no unpleasantnesses (aside from a bit of ragging about his galoshes . . .)—Bergen Evans

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Rib implies bantering under conditions which make it impossible or inadvisable for the butt to retort or defend himself and also may imply specifically the enactment of a role on the part of the ribber
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high government officials are ribbed in the skits presented yearly before the Gridiron Club in Washington

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ribs her fellow Russians as the temperamental ballerina who introduces her equals as her "supporting cast"— Time

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Josh and especially jolly imply transparent good humor in the funmaker.
Josh usually suggests homeliness and unsophistication
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for children he has jokes and candy. He cheers the men . . . and joshes the women— Time

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running the chatty, homespun, joshing sort of thing that actually goes on in a town— S.R.L.

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Jolly often implies an ulterior aim such as putting the person bantered into good humor so that he will grant a favor
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he was a good salesman who jollied his customers, but not too obviously

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{

jollied and joked with sailors in the street— Wecter

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Analogous words: twit, rally, deride, *ridicule

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Banter — Ban ter (b[a^]n t[ e]r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bantered} (b[a^]n t[ e]rd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Bantering}.] [Prob. corrupted fr. F. badiner to joke, or perh. fr. E. bandy to beat to and fro. See {Badinage}, and cf. {Barter} fr. OF. barater.] [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Banter — Ban ter, n. The act of bantering; joking or jesting; humorous or good humored raillery; pleasantry. [1913 Webster] Part banter, part affection. Tennyson. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • banter — [n] teasing badinage, chaff, chaffing, chitchat, derision, dissing*, exchange, fun, gossip, jeering, jesting, joking, joshing, kidding, mockery, persiflage, play, raillery, repartee, ribbing, ridicule, small talk; concepts 59,278 banter [v] tease …   New thesaurus

  • banter — ► NOUN ▪ the good humoured exchange of teasing remarks. ► VERB ▪ engage in banter. ORIGIN of unknown origin …   English terms dictionary

  • banter — [ban′tər] vt. [17th c. slang < ?] to tease or make fun of in a playful, good natured way vi. to exchange banter (with someone) n. good natured teasing, ridicule, or joking banterer n. banteringly adv …   English World dictionary

  • banter — (v.) 1670s, origin uncertain; said by Swift to be a word from London street slang. Related: Bantered; bantering. The noun is from 1680s …   Etymology dictionary

  • Banter — Harald Banter (* 16. März 1930 in Berlin als Gerd von Wysocki) ist ein deutscher Komponist, Arrangeur, Musikproduzent und Bandleader. Der Sohn des künstlerischen Leiters einer Schallplattenfirma kam früh mit der Welt der Musik in Berührung. Nach… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • banter — n. 1) to exchange banter with 2) good natured, light; witty banter * * * [ bæntə] light witty banter good natured to exchange banter with …   Combinatory dictionary

  • banter — ban|ter [ˈbæntə US ər] n [U] friendly conversation in which people make a lot of jokes with and amusing remarks about each other friendly/good natured/light hearted banter banter with/between ▪ easy banter between her cousins >banter v ▪ I… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • banter — [[t]bæ̱ntə(r)[/t]] banters, bantering, bantered 1) N UNCOUNT Banter is teasing or joking talk that is amusing and friendly. As she closed the door, she heard Tom exchanging good natured banter with Jane. Syn: badinage 2) V RECIP If you banter… …   English dictionary

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